Only The Libertarian Party Will Break The Mould Of UK Politics

Libertarian Party

Dan Liddicott – Midlands Coordinator


When you’re actively involved in an up-coming political party any mention in the news always brings a smile. Today that smile was provided by the CityAM.com article “Is the British political landscape ripe for a new centre party?” Alan Lockey, head of modern economy at Demos, argued that the time was right for a new centrist party, but it was Conservative commentator, Alex Deane, arguing against the motion, who gave the Libertarian Party the treasured mention. Unfortunately, Mr Deane was less than optimistic about the chances of any competition with the big two gaining traction.

In that assumption I believe Mr Deane is wrong.

To be fair to him, one thing Alex Deane is right about is that we in the Libertarian Party think we will “break the mould”. With plummeting popularity for both Labour and Conservatives, the approach of Brexit making UKIP defunct and the irrelevance of the Lib Dems, the timing is actually perfect for a new party. Not for a bog-standard centrist party, not for an obscure single-issue entity, nor for a party with £50m cash up front but nothing to stand for, but the time is right for the Libertarian Party which is none of those things. (more…)

We’ve Maxed Out Our Kid’s Credit Card. Can We Stop Now?

Skint

Dan Liddicott
Midlands/Mercia Region Coordinator and Students/Youth Coordinator


Among all the drivel coming out of the Tory party conference there was at least one brief window of sanity. Ministry of Justice Under-Secretary of State, Dr. Philip Lee MP, admitted in a fringe event that our beloved NHS is actually funded as a Ponzi scheme as he questioned the morality of asking younger people today to keep paying for a service from which they may never benefit.

The BBC reported that ‘the Bracknell MP told the meeting how he had clashed with George Osborne in 2015 after he described the then chancellor’s pensioner bond scheme as “intergenerational theft” designed to woo older voters at the expense of younger people’.

‘He suggested it was not fair to tell the under-44s who were “struggling” with a family: “‘Oh, by the way, we’re also going to tax you even more because this Ponzi scheme that we’ve had in play for pensions and for healthcare and for social care for the past 30 years is about to collapse. So therefore we want you to work really, really hard, but when you get to 65, it’s not going to be there.’ Hands up who thinks that’s a really compelling narrative?”‘ (BBC, 2 Oct 2017)

A damning assessment he’s since tried to row back on somewhat, but in actual fact he’s quite right. The welfare state, in fact, state funding as a whole, is a Ponzi scheme – so groaning under its own weight – that successive tranches of new payees cannot provide enough tax to support it all. (more…)

Pushing Back Against Cultural Marxism

Protesters Marching

Dan Liddicott
Midlands/Mercia Region Coordinator and Students/Youth Coordinator


It has been said that those who forget their history are doomed to repeat it. While this is true of so many things, the cultural marxist revolution we are now experiencing is perhaps the most insidious of them.

One of the most infamous movements of the cultural marxist revolution of the last century was kicked off in Peking University in 1966 at the hand of the Red Guard. In his book, The Cowshed: Memories of the Chinese Cultural Revolution, Xi Xianlin, a professor of Eastern Languages, recorded his first hand account of the events of those days, as they transpired right there on the Peking campus. From his descriptions one would be forgiven for drawing a comparison with the ‘activism’ of modern western student bodies, faculties, government departments, and court judgements over recent months and years. The similarity is chilling, and ought to serve as a stark warning of how far things have gone.

Cultural revolution was a term coined by Italian Marxist philosopher Antonio Gramsci in the 1920s and 30s. It was he who theorised that the new marxism could only be held in place, without constant force and violence, by the overthrow of pre-existing cultural institutions in addition to the political ones. While major marxist revolutions in the east began with violence quickly followed by cultural revolution, the proletariat uprising predicted by Marx to kick off in Britain failed to materialise. The reality was that the British working classes actively enjoyed the rising living standards of capitalism and free trade and so the necessary catalyst was missing. A different approach to bringing about marxism was needed in those western countries resistant to violent marxist revolution. That alternative approach was to bring about the cultural revolution first. This is what we see happening now. (more…)