Pushing Back Against Cultural Marxism

Protesters Marching

Dan Liddicott
Midlands/Mercia Region Coordinator and Students/Youth Coordinator


It has been said that those who forget their history are doomed to repeat it. While this is true of so many things, the cultural marxist revolution we are now experiencing is perhaps the most insidious of them.

One of the most infamous movements of the cultural marxist revolution of the last century was kicked off in Peking University in 1966 at the hand of the Red Guard. In his book, The Cowshed: Memories of the Chinese Cultural Revolution, Xi Xianlin, a professor of Eastern Languages, recorded his first hand account of the events of those days, as they transpired right there on the Peking campus. From his descriptions one would be forgiven for drawing a comparison with the ‘activism’ of modern western student bodies, faculties, government departments, and court judgements over recent months and years. The similarity is chilling, and ought to serve as a stark warning of how far things have gone.

Cultural revolution was a term coined by Italian Marxist philosopher Antonio Gramsci in the 1920s and 30s. It was he who theorised that the new marxism could only be held in place, without constant force and violence, by the overthrow of pre-existing cultural institutions in addition to the political ones. While major marxist revolutions in the east began with violence quickly followed by cultural revolution, the proletariat uprising predicted by Marx to kick off in Britain failed to materialise. The reality was that the British working classes actively enjoyed the rising living standards of capitalism and free trade and so the necessary catalyst was missing. A different approach to bringing about marxism was needed in those western countries resistant to violent marxist revolution. That alternative approach was to bring about the cultural revolution first. This is what we see happening now. (more…)